Stop Telling Yourself These 6 Creativity Myths

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Myth: I’m not a creative person.

Reality: When you label yourself, when you say that you are a creative or aren’t a leader, you’re really making decisions about what actions you will or won’t pursue. It turns out, when people believe they can change things like their brainpower, they become more curious and more open-minded and are less likely to give up. So change your story. Tell yourself you’re capable. And if you still don’t believe it, find people who’ve done what you want to do and listen to the story they tell themselves. Likely, they’re telling themselves to be patient, to get help and to push forward. When you tell yourself a better story, you’ll like the part you play.

Read more: 3 Steps to a Breakthrough

Myth: Inspiration will strike.

Reality: Actually, the most innovative solutions come from those who know the problems best. Those people really think about the problem over time, do research, and think about the issue from different perspectives. These people have also hit some serious roadblocks and have needed to start over, helping them strengthen the solution they’ll eventually find. So, instead of waiting, take action. Journaling, sketching, or even just a half hour a day to think about the problem you’re looking to solve will get you further than you’d get otherwise.

Read more: Mark Zuckerberg Calls the ‘A-Ha!’ Moment a Myth

Myth: I can go it alone.

Reality: When you get stuck, talk with friends or co-workers and use them as a sounding board. Complex problems require multiple viewpoints and creativity thrives on community and collaboration.
Read more: How to Build a Better Brainstorming Session

Myth: There is only one way to be creative.
Reality: False. Everyone has their own way of doing things and sparking inspiration, whether it’s working backwards from their vision of the finished product, making maps and charts, setting daily goals, working in different environments – don’t try and twist yourself into knots trying to emulate someone else’s idea of success.

Read more: What Picasso, King and Einstein Have to Teach Entrepreneurs

Read More: Stop Telling Yourself These 6 Creativity Myths

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